Tagged: experimental fiction

Amelia Gray's Museum of the Weird

#FridayReads: Amelia Gray’s Museum of the Weird

Amelia Gray’s Museum of the Weird begins with the unsettling tale “Babies” and builds layers of unsettling, odd, off-kilter, and slanted meaning from there. The stories work incredibly well on individual levels and together as a whole. “Babies” is about a woman who keeps having a baby—and then more than one baby—every night. The woman...

All of it’s true, and none of it happened

All of it’s true, and none of it happened

The book is perhaps the most challenging I’ve ever read, or ever will read, both from the perspective of writing craft and from the perspective of subject matter. The images and scenes are vivid and hard to face. They show carnage, destruction, cruelty and disfigurement, all of which are worse than death.

O’Brien’s writing is the same. He tears the craft apart, destroys the genre of fiction and leaves it bleeding and raw with its guts hanging out and its head cut off and posted on a stake at the entrance.

The magic and metafiction of “The Witch of Portobello”

The magic and metafiction of “The Witch of Portobello”

As a modern Pagan, it’s absolutely wonderful to see a writer treating magic and the supernatural in such a…natural way. Paulo Coelho’s The Witch of Portobello speaks frankly about magic and its place in the world, and more importantly, accepts it.

The Witch Athena may be a troubled character, but her struggles and her art resonated deeply with me. To find a character that I could relate to on a spiritual level, well, that doesn’t happen very often, and this is a book I’ll come back to because of that.

#FridayReads: All My Puny Sorrows by Miriam Toews

#FridayReads: All My Puny Sorrows by Miriam Toews

Suicide is not the kind of thing you discuss at the dinner table. Even when we do talk about it, we tend to take one point of view: Prevent it at all costs. But who are we to decide what course someone else should take? Miriam Toews’ novel All My Puny Sorrows raises that question...

The Hypothetical Girl exposes the hidden emotion of online dating

The Hypothetical Girl exposes the hidden emotion of online dating

Every story in Elizabeth Cohen’s first collection, The Hypothetical Girl, has a “Yes, yes that’s it!” moment. These are romance stories for the connected twenty-first century, but I have to warn you, most of them don’t have happy endings. Although online dating is gaining more acceptance in our culture, a lot of people still look...