Miss Migraine Gets Angry Part 2

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The Adventures of Miss Migraine is an ongoing column about my life with chronic migraine. A version of this post appeared first on my blog of the same name on December 19, 2012.

If you read Miss Migraine Gets Angry, you know that my insurance company tried to limit my access to triptans, and that I planned to follow through with them and correct their egregious money-grubbing behavior. (Oops, did I type that out loud?)

Unfortunately, I wasn’t entirely successful, partly because I’m currently unable to take triptans at all (more on that in another post). But my neurologist did send the insurance company an authorization for them to a.) cover Maxalt and b). give me the full 12 pills my prescription calls for.

A tower of pills

Insurance companies’ policies determine our level of access to health care.

While I was waiting for the authorization to go through, I called the FDA, and they directed me to information online proving that no, the FDA does not regulate insurance companies and that, yes, the recommended Maxalt dosing comes out to 12 10-mg. pills per month [Note: The page I had linked here doesn’t seem to exist anymore, and my lazy Googling did not come up with a ready replacement]. I emailed this to the insurance company with a polite, but firm, note. I never received a response, and they refused to let me speak directly with the pharmacy department. The woman I spoke with, while polite, seemed frustrated with my insistence.

So did it help? Has my insurance company changed its policies? Nope.

There’s one more step I can take, though. That’s to call the local branch of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, an organization that helps protect the public’s interest when it comes to insurance of all kinds, including health. I’ve been too sick with migraines to do this (and the urgency isn’t there since I can’t take the pills), but I plan to after the holidays.

This issue goes beyond me. It’s an issue that affects all migraine patients. In the greater scheme, insurance companies that limit prescriptions of any kind affect not only all of us suffering from  chronic illnesses, but those suffering from acute illnesses as well.

(And as a foot note, the authorization did go through and was approved, but there was some kind of issue between the pharmacy and the insurance company. I didn’t bother figuring out what it was since I can’t take Maxalt now anyway, but let’s just say this has been anything but a smooth process.)

Has your insurance company tried to limit your medications? What steps have you taken?

 

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