Miss Migraine: How supporting local agriculture helps my migraines

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The Adventures of Miss Migraine is an ongoing column about my life with chronic migraine. This post appeared first on my blog of the same name on August 10, 2012.

First, I chop the potatoes and add them to the broth. Then I peel the carrots, slice them, and send them in after the potatoes. Next comes a whole miniature purple cabbage and a medium yellow onion, roughly chopped. Then two fennel bulbs chopped willy-nilly and and a small, fat zucchini that had been hiding out in a corner of the fridge and was nearing the end of its edible life.

Organic vegetable soup

A bowl of Whatever-I-Have-In-The-Fridge-Soup. Photo by Kelly Lynn Thomas.

I love the rhythm of chopping and slicing vegetables, the knife in my hand, moving up and down, the steady collisions with the cutting board. The fennel is the most difficult to attack. Layers fall away as I work at it, preventing an easy pattern. The rest require varying applications of pressure: the knife slides easily through the zucchini without much help from me, but I must push it down to separate each slice of carrot.

All of the vegetables and herbs come from Kretschmann Organic Farm. Each week, we get a box of fresh produce and other goodies delivered to a pick-up spot in our neighborhood. We don’t know what we’re going to get in advance, and we can’t pick anything out (though we can order extra things like blueberries, peaches, chicken, beef, cheese, coffee, etc.). To me, this is a relief. It means fewer trips to the grocery store, becuase we only need to buy dry goods, and we can buy them in bulk. It also means less time spent in the grocery store.This translates to less energy expended and less stress, and less of a chance for the harsh lights, strong smells, and screechy carts to exacerbate my migraine.

Looking at the soup’s color, I decide it needs more orange. Three more sliced carrots go into the broth. I let it simmer for awhile — I don’t bother to time it. Eventually, I take my tomato knife out and dice four juicy, perfectly ripe tomatoes. When I feel especially motivated, I tear piles of fresh herbs from their stems: rosemary, thyme, parsley. This time, though, I let bunches of dried herbs steep in the broth for a long time before I started cooking.

It’s 86 degrees Fahrenheit, but I don’t care. My Whatever-Vegetables-I-Have-In-The-Fridge-Soup requires no thought, no planning, is easy to prepare, impossible to mess up, will last for several days, and is delicious and healthy. This is my favorite thing to cook. Sometimes I add beans, but this time I simply forgot.

local, organic vegetables from a CSA

A selection of vegetables, fruit, and herbs from this week’s produce box (beets, swiss chard, red onion, cabbages, peaches, dill, cilantro, tomatoes). Photo by Kelly Lynn Thomas.

For someone with a constant headache, the routine of picking up a box of veggies at the same time and place every single week is comforting. The food we get from Kretschmann is a higher quality and fresher than what we get from the store. Fresher foods have less tyramine, a compound that develops as foods decay and that can trigger migraines for some people.

My husband and I sat down in the living room with our big bowls of fresh soup and a fan blowing our way to keep us cool while we watched the first season finale of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, which I had finally convinced him to watch with me. We ate slowly while Buffy fought ugly-faced, toothy undead. I can’t speak for him, but I was content.

There are subscription-based programs like this, called Community Supported Agriculture or CSAs, all over the country. To learn more about them or find one in your area, visit www.LocalHarvest.org/csa. I’m not getting paid to talk about CSAs; I simply think they’re a great way to help the environment, the local economy, my body, and my migraines.

What do you do to make cooking and food preparation easier?

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