Category: bookish

#FridayReads July 1, 2016

#FridayReads July 1, 2016

Lily and the Octopus by Steven Rowley: A bittersweet novel that avoids all the “man’s best friend” cliches and reminds why we love dogs so much, even though we outlive them. Create Your Writer Platform by Chuck Sambuchino: An informative, no-nonsense book about the how, what, where, and when of getting seen online and, to...

Metafiction and the anti-war message of Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five

Metafiction and the anti-war message of Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five

The use of metafiction in anti-war fiction is fairly common (Slaughterhouse-Five, The Things They Carried). Does the inclusion of the author as a character in Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five (and the knowledge that the “author” fought in World War II) lend credibility to the anti-war message, or does it weaken the message by taking away from the story and characters by using an overbearing delivery?

#FridayReads: Bitch Planet

#FridayReads: Bitch Planet

Title: Bitch Planet Vol. 1: Extraordinary Machine Author: Kelly Sue Deconnick (script), Valentine De Landro (covers/art), Robert Wilson IV (art on issue 3), Cris Peter (colors), and Clayton Cowles (letters) Publisher: Image Comics Publication Date: 2015 Format: Trade paperback Pages: 136 ISBN: 978-1632153661 List Price: $9.99 As a card-carrying, ardent feminist, Bitch Planet is the...

#FridayReads: A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

#FridayReads: A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Title: A Writer’s Guide to Persistence Author: Jordan Rosenfeld Publisher: Writer’s Digest Books Publication Date: May 13, 2015 Format: Trade paperback Pages: 234 ISBN: 003-5313661976 List Price: $16.99 If you’ve ever felt discouraged by your writing—like you’re not good enough, like there’s no point, like it just doesn’t matter—this book is for you. This is...

But it was true for me…

But it was true for me…

No one likes being lied to.  Especially by a memoirist.  If even one event in a memoir is made up, it makes the rest of the story suspect. In autobiographical fiction, though, it’s okay if the author “lies” to us, because we go into the reading experience expecting, well, fiction.  Not real events. An article...