Category: bookish

Two funny books about books

Two funny books about books

It’s Wednesday. I woke up with a roaring migraine. Therefore, I’m not having real thoughts. Only ghost thoughts, or half thoughts. So instead, some humor. First: This book delivers exactly what the title promises: bizarre, odd, and downright creepy things people have said in bookstores across the country (there’s even an entry from Penguin Bookshop...

A weekend full of books

A weekend full of books

I buy a lot of books, and I try to never feel bad about spending money on things that bring me so much joy. This weekend we spent more money than we should have on books, (we should be spending zero dollars on non-essentials), but Half Price Books had a twenty percent off everything sale...

Amelia Gray's Museum of the Weird

#FridayReads: Amelia Gray’s Museum of the Weird

Amelia Gray’s Museum of the Weird begins with the unsettling tale “Babies” and builds layers of unsettling, odd, off-kilter, and slanted meaning from there. The stories work incredibly well on individual levels and together as a whole. “Babies” is about a woman who keeps having a baby—and then more than one baby—every night. The woman...

David Comfort’s publishing guide is not so comforting

David Comfort’s publishing guide is not so comforting

David Comfort’s The Insider’s Guide to Publishing is depressing, although I believe he was aiming for darkly humorous. Unfortunately, I found the humor to be more annoying than funny. I will save you the trouble of reading it by distilling the information here: Publication is unlikely, especially paid publication. Your book will probably flop, and...

All of it’s true, and none of it happened

All of it’s true, and none of it happened

The book is perhaps the most challenging I’ve ever read, or ever will read, both from the perspective of writing craft and from the perspective of subject matter. The images and scenes are vivid and hard to face. They show carnage, destruction, cruelty and disfigurement, all of which are worse than death.

O’Brien’s writing is the same. He tears the craft apart, destroys the genre of fiction and leaves it bleeding and raw with its guts hanging out and its head cut off and posted on a stake at the entrance.